Weekly newspaper of Three Rivers, California, and Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks

News

  One of six clandestine pot-growing sites spotted in the eastern Tulare County mountains by helicopter overflights was eradicated near Three Rivers on July 9 and 10. That site was identified by the Tulare County Sheriff’s Department public information officer as located on east Case Mountain on Bureau of Land Management property. The raid was carried out by detectives from the Tulare County...
  The California Fish and Game Commission has voted to move forward with listing the gray wolf as an endangered species under state law. The vote took place last month with three commissioners voting for the listing and one voting against (the fifth member was absent). The decision provides permanent protection for the gray wolf and immediate protection under the California Endangered Species Act...
OM NOM NOM… as in Blake and Amy’s Om Nom Nom! Cafe, formerly Dry Creek Deli and located at the Woodlake turnoff on Highway 198 in Lemon Cove.  New name but the same home-style menu with daily specials.  Why Om Nom Nom? Think  Cookie Monster on Sesame Street when he devours cookies. According to Blake: “That’s our motto: om nom nom in Sasquatch means delicious!”
Former Three Rivers resident Carroll Barnes was a renowned sculptor who worked in wood and stone. The Three Rivers Historical Society recently obtained a collection of 100 or so pieces from the Sonoma County Historical Society in Santa Rosa, near Barnes’s last home of Sebastopol, and has been busy archiving the works. Much of the art is now on display at the Historical Museum (42268 Sierra Drive...
The first six months of 2014 were the hottest ever in California, according to the National Weather Service. The period was nearly 5 degrees warmer than the 20th century average and more than a degree hotter than the record set in 1934, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said. Additionally, June 2014 was the Earth’s hottest June ever and marked the 38th consecutive June and 352nd...
RAIN BIRD: A blue grouse chick hunkers down during a high-country rainstorm last Sunday in the Mineral King area of Sequoia National Park.
  El Nino might be California’s only hope for a drought-busting winter. But that superhero weather system might not arrive in time to save winter. Earlier hopes that the drought would break soon have been tempered. The National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center downplayed the help that El Nino may bring to the drought-plagued West in its monthly report of Pacific Ocean weather patterns...
SET IN STONE: A plaque commemorating the creation of the Mineral King Road Cultural Landscape District is at the entrance to the Mineral King Ranger Station.
A contingent of Mineral King Preservation Society members, National Park Service personnel, and Mineral King visitors gathered in the east Mineral King area adjacent to the Peterson cabin for what’s been an annual affair for 28 years.  The Saturday, July 19, program included remarks by Woody Smeck, superintendent of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, and William Martin, Mineral King cabin...
Megan McArthur Behnken, Ph.D.
On their way to participate in the Dark Sky Festival that is being held all weekend throughout Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, a husband-and-wife team of NASA astronauts will stop off in Three Rivers and spend a couple hours talking about their life’s work. “It is rare that NASA approves requests for astronaut appearances, and we have two of them,” said Mark Tilchen, executive director...
July’s full moon is one of five super moons in 2014. The supermoon occurs when the moon becomes full on the same days as its perigee, which is the point in the moon’s orbit when it is closest to Earth. Night owls, stargazers, and early morning risers will be able to feast their eyes on more lunar showings soon. The next two supermoons are scheduled for August 10 and September 9, according to NASA...

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