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December 30, 2011

MAKIN' HISTORY:
Forecast 2012

by John Elliott

  Hope all enjoyed last week’s color issue and a peaceful holiday. That three-day weekend with Christmas on Sunday followed by the legal holiday was certainly ideal for those of us self-employed working folks.

  I would be in favor of Christmas and New Year’s being permanently celebrated over three-day weekends. Next year is a leap year and that means Christmas will fall on a Tuesday.

  Would some Biblical scholar or Wiki editor kindly explain the rationale for Christmas on December 25? Somehow in my education this little known factoid from World History class has gotten lost in the consumerist shuffle.

  Those Tuesday holidays in 2012 will wreak havoc on a weekly newspaper schedule. But then there are but two weekly newspapers left in these parts; only one — The Kaweah Commonwealth — if the criteria is newspapers that operate in an unincorporated area and/or be independently owned. 

  By now you might have noticed the passing, or like the current editor called it, the silencing, of the Valley Voice, published for more than three decades in Visalia. There was a lot more than could be told to this silencing of another weekly newspaper. It was obvious that a publication that lived and thrived in the business climate would be even more subject to the whims of a poor economy.

  A few years ago when the Voice went from twice monthly to weekly, I was wondering if they really knew what they were getting into. One bump in the road of the tortuous weekly deadlines could spell disaster and, think what you will about the lawsuit and the embezzlement, the cost of doing business is what led to the demise of the Voice.

  That bottom line is why, from the mighty New York Times to your parochial Commonwealth, in order to survive, newspapers must all do the same thing — reinvent themselves.

  For starters, the price on the Commonwealth’s front page of the print issue will change from 50 cents to 75 cents effective with the January 6 issue. For those of you who still insist on fumbling for change and making a donation to a collection can, that’s okay, but the next 50 issues will cost you $37.50.

  The cost of a local subscription is $35; out of town is $40. Those prices haven’t budged in a decade. There are nearly 200 local subscriptions and a little more than that number that are shipped out of town each week.

  Ultimately, those paid subscriptions will mean make-or-break for the sustainability of this local newspaper. If you have ever considered buying a subscription for yourself, family member, or a friend now is the time.

  It’s the most efficient and environmentally friendly way to get your Commonwealth. Week after week you will find your newspaper with your mail on Friday. By supporting the local post office’s biggest customer, you also support keeping the windows open at the Three Rivers Post Office.     

  And there will be more changes coming soon for the TKC online edition and website. In 2011, we completed a total upgrade on the Kaweah Kam. Check it out on this site.

  In 2012, we are planning to change the entire look of the home page and the accessibility of the hundreds of pages that reside behind each mouse click. There is more useful and informative content on the site than any other in the region, all dedicated to making the Kaweah Country experience the best it can be.

  Also in 2012 we will continue to build upon the success of the Kaweah Country Run series, successful events that were held at Lake Kaweah that promote a healthy, fit lifestyle while raising funds for worthwhile causes. We are currently in the planning stages for a spring event to be held in Sequoia National Park featuring a Half Marathon run, 10K run and a 10K hike.

  But for now, the print edition will remain the centerpiece of The Kaweah Commonwealth. Changes in the works at the printer will mean in 2012 there will be more color more often. These new printed pages will hopefully do better justice to the incredible visuals we enjoy every day in these mountains and foothills.

  There will be more community contributors, more news, more sports, and the same great hyper-local coverage you have come to know and look forward to in these pages. We appreciate your solid support in the past 17 years as advertisers and readers, and with the help of the powers that be we will be around a little longer.

  Best wishes for a happy, healthy New Year from our family to yours.

 

November 18, 2011

TELLING IT LIKE IT IS:
Gang Summit had plenty of speakers,

low audience turnout

by Sarah Elliott

 Woodlake High School, in cooperation with the City of Woodlake and its police department, hosted a free “Gang Summit” on Thursday, Nov. 3. There were 10 speakers, each discussing their specific area of expertise, and about 20 people in the audience, and that is a generous estimate, which includes the young children who were only there because their parents were there.
   Noticeably, there were no Three Rivers parents in attendance.
   If WHS feels the need to educate its student body and their families about gangs, drug use, and the symptoms thereof, there must be a reason. It was interesting that more parents weren’t just a little bit curious about what would be revealed at this event.
   Woodlake High School, the elementary schools, and the Woodlake Police Department have for years been proactive when dealing with gang activity. That is why many may be under the false assumption that Woodlake doesn’t have a gang problem.
   But rival gangs are in the city. And where there are gangs, there are prospective members.
   In all honesty, a Three Rivers teen joining a Mexican gang is a highly unlikely probability. So the parenting task just got a little easier, but Three Rivers parents still need to be diligent.
   I was told by several WHS staff members that “Three Rivers has a drug problem.” And this isn’t the only mess that Three Rivers kids are getting themselves into. There have been break-ins at Three Rivers School recently as well.
   So if parents in Three Rivers are not closely monitoring their kids’ whereabouts or asking the right questions, then their offspring could be headed down the wrong path with no one there to provide them with the right directions.
   Have you searched your teen’s room? You should.
   They should have no expectation of privacy while living under your roof. It’s the parent’s job to keep them safe and out of trouble.
   They aren’t going to sit down and have a heart-to-heart talk with you about stealing cases of candy from the school, experimenting with drugs, or getting drunk on the weekends. But you might find evidence of such things if you look in their room, closets, binder, or backpack. It’s better to know now than later.
   Do you know the difference between a marijuana pipe and a pipe used to smoke meth? I do now, after attending this meeting.
   Do you know how to spot a gang member, which gangs are prevalent in Woodlake, or how to tell if your child is wearing gang attire? You would if you had attended the Gang Summit.
   Did you know that the city of Woodlake has a curfew? I didn’t, but I am now aware that it is 10:30 p.m. to 4 a.m., and parents will be fined if their children are in violation of this ordinance.
  “Hope is not a strategy,” stated one speaker. “You can’t just hope your kids are going to make it.”
   Getting kids through their teenage years and on the road to becoming responsible adults takes relentless parental involvement. And there are no days off at this job: it’s 24/7/365.
   Woodlake High promised they would hold these informational sessions regularly. Plan on attending in the future... for your teen’s future.

 

July 22, 2011

TELLING IT LIKE IT IS:
More same-sex parents choosing

to raise children in Tulare County

by Sarah Elliott

  Here’s an interesting statistic. U.S. census figures released last month reveal that the county with the highest percentage of same-sex couples raising children isn’t where you would think (San Francisco comes to mind, right?).

  It’s conservative Tulare County. And according to a June 24 article in the San Francisco Chronicle, several other places in the Central Valley and other rural areas are not far behind.

  There are 824 same-sex couples that call Tulare County home, the census reports. Of those, about 46 percent have chosen to have and raise children. That is the highest percentage among counties with more than 50 same-sex couples.

  Tulare County certainly doesn’t have a gay-friendly reputation. In 2008, three-fourths of all voters were in favor of Proposition 8, which eliminated the right for gay men or lesbians to marry.

  In California overall, Proposition 8 passed by just 52.3 percent. In San Francisco, voters opposed the measure by 75.2 percent.

  A demographer from UCLA explains the recently released statistics. One reason same-sex couples choose to raise their children in conservative counties such as Tulare is that many same-sex couples are raising children from heterosexual relationships they had before they came out.

  By living in a conservative county, it may take longer for some to embrace their true sexual orientation. Once they do, the demographer reasons, many same-sex couples then choose to continue raising their children close to where the other parent lives or to live in the place where they had already established their lives.

  The census figures show that only 19 percent of the same-sex couples reported adopting their children. That means 81 percent are either raising children from previous relationships or are raising children they had through a surrogate or artificial insemination.

  Other same-sex couples are most likely turning to the Central Valley for the same reasons as heterosexual couples: Cities are expensive and the schools troubled.

  Overall, the number of same-sex couples in California has increased since the last census, from about 92,100 in 2000 to about 125,500 in 2010.

  In San Francisco County, there are 11,555 same-sex couples, the highest proportion in California. That’s 33.41 same-sex couples for every 1,000 households. However, San Francisco has the lowest percentage of same-sex couples raising families, only seven percent.

  Whether same-sex or heterosexual, we are talking about families who are raising children.  No matter how one feels about another’s sexual orientation, we would be sad examples of human beings if we taught our children to discriminate against another child or their parents because of a negative opinion of that family’s lifestyle.

  All families deserve to be accepted. They should feel safe where they decide to live, no matter where it is or why. They have the right to live their lives to the fullest and feel confident about allowing their children to participate fully in their school and activities. All children deserve to be raised in a healthy, loving home where they can grow and excel.

  Sexual orientation is just one part of an individual’s identity. They are also parent, somebody’s son or daughter, neighbor, coworker, classmate, friend.

  It’s hard to imagine that interracial marriage in the United States has only been fully legal in all U.S. states since the 1967 Supreme Court decision that deemed anti-miscegenation laws unconstitutional. Today, it seems preposterous that interracial marriage was ever subject to legislation. Someday in the not-too-distant future, same-sex marriage will be as widely tolerated.

  And tolerance is key. Nobody’s conservative values are challenged simply because someone else has a lifestyle that might be different from theirs.

  Tulare County is in for a big turnaround in the next generation. All these children being raised by gay couples won’t stand for the discrimination that goes on here today.

  I, for one, am glad that more and more same-sex couples are raising their children here. I know from raising my own kids here that it’s the right choice.

July 8, 2011

TELLING IT LIKE IT IS:
Taking what isn't theirs

by Sarah Elliott

  The summertime hoodlums are lurking and must be really bored. Gone now is the green box that provided convenient access to The Kaweah Commonwealth for Cherokee Oaks residents.

  Over the years, we’ve lost other boxes; the one at the Three Rivers Memorial Building didn’t last a month while the Blossom Drive box has had to have major surgery a few times due to vandals.

  We won’t replace these boxes once they’re gone. At over $100 each, it’s not worth it; we might as well put a sign on it that says take me.

  After all, that means we are investing in something so readers can take a free paper. You don’t have to be a Wall Street banker to realize there’s not much of a return on that investment.

 

Why to buy

  Although we will continue to saturate Three Rivers and surrounding areas with The Kaweah Commonwealth each week, we would appreciate if readers would pay for their weekly newspaper or purchase a subscription to have it delivered to their mailbox.

  Publishing a newspaper is becoming an expensive proposition. Print prices and mailing costs have increased exponentially in the last decade.

  We do our best to keep costs at a minimum, which is the reason Three Rivers still has a newspaper when no other unincorporated community in the tri-county area does. In fact, many incorporated cities don’t have a newspaper anymore either.

  I think back often to 1995 when we first began publishing the Commonwealth. We had so much to learn, and after the first month I wasn’t satisfied at all with the product we were providing.

  Now, however, and I say this humbly, the newspaper has matured to a point where I am proud of what we create week in, week out. This is a hard, demanding job and we sacrifice much to do it. It is demeaning to our efforts and the quality of the newspaper when a local resident takes one for free.

  The Commonwealth is so much more valuable. For instance, here is an excerpt of a letter dated July 1, 2011, signed by a visitor from Indianapolis, Ind.:

  “I always check out the local, small papers when we travel, and The Kaweah Commonwealth is definitely one of the best that I have read.”

 

Faithful followers

  In the United States, some 7,500 community newspapers (under 30,000 in circulation) hit the streets, front porches, and mailboxes at least once a week. A 2010 survey conducted by the University of Missouri, Columbia, produced some interesting statistics: More than three-quarters of respondents said they read most or all of a local newspaper every week.   And in news that warms the heart of this publisher, a full 94 percent said that they paid for their papers.

 

News you can use

  Rural newspapers are actually healthier than metro newspapers these days because they haven’t been invaded by Internet competition. Keeping with the Commonwealth’s mission of “We tell you things you won’t read, hear, or see anywhere else,” there is no effective competition for local news.

  Craigslist can’t get its grip on small communities while Facebook and Twitter feature some of the news only some of the time. But the Commonwealth still owns the franchise of being the most credible source of news that happens in and around Three Rivers and Sequoia National Park.

  In addition, we add a personal touch because every death, every event, every business opening or closing means something to us. The newspaper is like our weekly letter to Three Rivers, written because we enjoy visiting with our readers. We have a relationship since we live here too, and because of that, we tell the truth while weighing that against living with the people about whom we must write.

  These days, 60 percent of weekly newspapers are owned by a chain, which can really hamper editorial operations. Since we are independently owned, there isn’t a suit in some distant office telling us what to do or say to please investors.

  The monetary rewards for owning a small weekly are not great, but the personal reward is immense. There is no one else on Earth who can cover what we cover or know what we know, and people will not be aware of what’s going on in Three Rivers any other way.

 

Affordable, informative

  It is up to Three Rivers residents to ensure a community newspaper remains a viable entity. So, please, consider shelling out two quarters each week — that’s less than a pack of gum — to support rural journalism in Three Rivers. To save on the cost of gas by driving to an outlet, purchasing a subscription is a convenient way to have the newspaper waiting for you when you get home after a long, hard week (70 cents a week. What a deal! Hmmm, I might be convincing myself to raise prices).

 

We(heart) subscribers

  By the way, Three Rivers subscribers, a hearty thank-you is due. Local subscriptions are nearing the number of the out-of-town subscriptions (when that milestone is met, it will be a first).

  In addition, the renewal rate of locals is 100 percent some months and never drops below 95 percent. That is unheard of in the newspaper business. Much gratitude to our faithful readers!

  A subscription form is always available on the Classifieds page in the print edition or call the Commonwealth office with your credit card number.

 

July 8, 2011

TELLING IT LIKE IT IS:
Stay high, dry... and alive -

Don't be the next victim

by Sarah Elliott

  It was a morbid prediction, but we knew there would be a drowning last weekend. It was the perfect equation: the hottest weather of the year thus far plus unseasonably high, swift, cold rivers plus a busy holiday weekend.
   As of July 7, there have been two visitor drownings on the Kaweah and one on the Kings River (one of those within the boundaries of Sequoia-Kings Canyon) during 2011.

Keepers, sweepers, and more
   The local rivers are deceivingly beautiful but so dangerous. Even if the surface of a river appears calm there are strong currents beneath the surface and deadly rapids just around the bend.
   Many have perished — children, too — by innocently walking near the river as the rocks are water-polished and slippery and the bluffs are steep and hazardous. Once in the water, there are several ways to perish: (1) Hypothermia due to the water’s 50-degree temperature. (2) A fatal blow to the head due to hitting a boulder or drowning due to foot entrapment between rocks. (3) Keepers, sweepers, holes, eddies, whirlpools, chutes, and strainers are also waiting for an unsuspecting victim (these are descriptions of how water flows through and around the various obstacles in and alongside the rivers. Encountering any one of these in high water means certain death by drowning as getting out unaided is nearly impossible).

River warning systems
   How can we stop this annual tradition of visitors dying? A friend recently mentioned signs that indicate the threat level of the water (reminiscent of terrorist threats or, more locally, fire hazard signs).
   This is the best idea I’ve heard, however, it would work better if everyone had the same level of swimming ability and if every waterway — from streams to creeks to rivers — maintained similar conditions.
   So if this system was used, would the threat level ever be set to low? Would there be liability if someone drowned in “low” water? Would “low” indicate that all are welcome to cross private property to get to the river because it’s swimmable?
   What about a huge billboard at the entrance to Three Rivers? “Welcome to Three Rivers. Stay away from the river!” A Three Rivers artist could create the colorful warning sign, and we certainly could come up with a better choice of words while still getting the message across.
   We have river warnings year-round on our web page (www.kaweahcommonwealth.com) as does Bill Pooley on his comprehensive Kaweah River Page (www.kaweahriver.org) and Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks on its website (www.nps.gov/seki). But this is just preaching to the choir.
   How can we possibly reach those who need to hear the message the most? Believe it or not, you can help. Read on...

Award-winning team
   To date, the best idea ever put into practice is the River Rovers, an idea first presented in 2003 in a letter to the editor published in THE KAWEAH COMMONWEALTH. The letter-writer was the friend of a coworker of a distraught Visalia mother whose 22-year-old son had recently drowned in the Kaweah River in Sequoia National Park. The concept was adapted by the local Park Service as the River Rovers.
   The River Rovers program recently won the 2011 Andrew Clark Hecht Memorial Public Safety Achievement Award, the highest award bestowed by the National Park Service for outstanding achievement in public and employee safety. Sixteen current and past volunteers and several park staff were recognized for their efforts in keeping park visitors safe from river hazards.
   The Andrew Clark Hecht Memorial Public Safety Achievement Award is in memory of Andrew Clark Hecht, the nine-year-old son of Drs. James and Amy Hecht who died in 1970 as a result of an accident in Yellowstone National Park’s Crested Pool. The award includes a plaque and a monetary contribution to the parks’ safety program.
   River Rovers are volunteers who walk the riverside trails, go to the popular swimming holes, and visit the foothills picnic areas and campgrounds to talk with park visitors about river safety.
   River Rovers volunteers are always needed. To apply, go to www.volunteers.gov. For more information, call 565-4212.

 

July 1, 2011

TELLING IT LIKE IT IS:
Phonebooks - Trash and treasure

by Sarah Elliott

  Hey, AT&T. With a town full of vacation homes, second homes, and absolutely vacant homes, your method of delivering phonebooks does nothing to improve the aesthetics of Three Rivers.

  Big books wrapped in day-glo orange plastic bags dropped in piles wherever there is a mailbox makes for one ugly mess. We will be staring at roadside orange lumps for many months to come.

  I hear tell that massive profits are being made by your mega-corporation, so spend a few bucks and mail the phonebooks instead. It should be illegal to dump a pile of plastic and paper at someone’s driveway. Oh wait, it is; it’s called littering.

  Three Rivers residents and their cell phones are already held hostage by your company as there are no other providers that serve the area. Now you show your extreme dominance over our town by marking your territory with bright orange bundles left wherever there is a semblance of human occupation.

   Is there any policy at AT&T where the drivers have to return within 30 days and pick up any of the phonebooks that still remain at the side of the road? I didn’t think so.

  As for the Three Rivers community phonebook that we have been charged with producing this time around, here’s an update.

  When we take on a project, we insist on doing it right. Since this is our first time publishing the local phonebook, we have quite a bit of work to do.

  We never received a database, so every number was retyped... by me! We received over a dozen emails from residents who said they have tried “twice” previously to get in the phonebook; not just once, but twice!

  Now we are in the process of calling every listing to verify names and phone numbers. We were initially going to hire someone to do this, but once the scope of the task was revealed just by calling page one, John is insisting on doing this chore himself to ensure absolute accuracy.

  On the most recent page called, for instance, there were 23 disconnects and several other numbers that have long since been reassigned yet remained improperly listed. In fact, there are many double phone listings; even some triples!

  Look forward to the new phonebook as it is coming soon, but please be patient.

 

July 1, 2011

MAKIN' HISTORY:
It's all in the numbers

by John Elliott

  Hey, AT&T. With a town full of vacation homes, second homes, and absolutely vacant homes, your method of delivering phonebooks does nothing to improve the aesthetics of Three Rivers.
   Big books wrapped in day-glo orange plastic bags dropped in piles wherever there is a mailbox makes for one ugly mess. We will be staring at roadside orange lumps for many months to come.
   I hear tell that massive profits are being made by your mega-corporation, so spend a few bucks and mail the phonebooks instead. It should be illegal to dump a pile of plastic and paper at someone’s driveway. Oh wait, it is; it’s called littering.
   Three Rivers residents and their cell phones are already held hostage by your company as there are no other providers that serve the area. Now you show your extreme dominance over our town by marking your territory with bright orange bundles left wherever there is a semblance of human occupation.
   Is there any policy at AT&T where the drivers have to return within 30 days and pick up any of the phonebooks that still remain at the side of the road? I didn’t think so.
   As for the Three Rivers community phonebook that we have been charged with producing this time around, here’s an update.
   When we take on a project, we insist on doing it right. Since this is our first time publishing the local phonebook, we have quite a bit of work to do.
   We never received a database, so every number was retyped... by me! We received over a dozen emails from residents who said they have tried “twice” previously to get in the phonebook; not just once, but twice!
   Now we are in the process of calling every listing to verify names and phone numbers. We were initially going to hire someone to do this, but once the scope of the task was revealed just by calling page one, John is insisting on doing this chore himself to ensure absolute accuracy.
   On the most recent page called, for instance, there were 23 disconnects and several other numbers that have long since been reassigned yet remained improperly listed. In fact, there are many double phone listings; even some triples!
   Look forward to the new phonebook as it is coming soon, but please be patient.

April 8, 2011

MAKIN' HISTORY:
38th Jazzaffair - Weather or not

by John Elliott

  What will make this Jazzaffair, or the one like the 1999 edition, for instance, the most memorable event of any jazz festival on the planet? If you answered the music, or the scenery, or the incomparable High Sierra Jazz Band, you are only part correct.
   Ask any veteran of Jazzaffairs and I can guarantee they will answer, or at least mention, the Three Rivers weather. If you don’t believe me, just look around and consider what t  hose of us already know who live here.
   Three Rivers has some very interesting weather. Sometimes during Jazzaffair, all of it is experienced in one weekend. That will certainly be the case this year.
   After wearing shorts during 80-degree temperatures Monday through Wednesday, locals braced for near record lows this morning (Friday, April 8) in the 30s and kept the layers of warm clothing handy because it could snow right here at Lions Arena or the Memorial Building. If it does snow in town at 1000 feet elevation and it does every few years or so, it will be an unforgettable, albeit short-lived winter wonderland.
   The chance of snow in the lower elevations is not so far-fetched this year because we’ve already had more than 425 inches of snow (and still counting) in the nearby mountains above 7,000 feet. That’s certainly several feet short of what they got this season on the east side at Mammoth (approaching 600 inches), but an all-time record for these parts.
   And what’s even more amazing is that the snow season is not done yet. While Mammoth has reported they will be skiing until July 4th, all that white stuff in the higher elevations will allow us to ski longer, too, although in Sequoia Park it will be the Nordic variety.
   By Friday, high pressure will begin to build back in and we will experience one of those crisp, clear-out days for Saturday. It will be so beautiful here you will forget it was rainy and blustery just 24 hours ago.
   So let’s get this party started whether it’s your first Jazzaffair or like Earl, Bruce, and Charlie of High Sierra, their 38th.

Musically speaking
   Rusty Crain, the director of Jazzaffair and manager of the High Sierra Jazz Band, told me earlier this week that Three Rivers has three of the top five bands on the festival circuit.   After the one that comes immediately to mind, I’m not all that certain who the other two are because all these pros play hot, tasty jazz and each one features some of the best musicians who perform anywhere.
   What I do know for certain is that there will be visiting royalty at this year’s Jazzaffair. That’s because Tom Rigney — who along with Flambeau is making his third consecutive appearance at Jazzaffair — has been dubbed the Emperor of the 2011 Sacramento Jazz Jubilee (May). The festival in the river city is the granddaddy of all these jazz fests.
   In fact, the Sacramento festival is not only the biggest of all these festivals, it’s actually the second oldest continuing festival; it actually started a month after the Jazzberry Jam (HSJB’s predecessor) kicked off the first jazz festival here in Three Rivers.
   I don’t even think Tom Rigney knows for sure what’s in store for him during his 2011 reign as Emperor. But taking over for clarinet player Bob Draga, who was last year’s Emperor, must mean you will be both the source and brunt of some of zany antics and that you are recognized as an enormous musical talent by your peers.
   Zany antics and enormous musical talent — that’s what we all have come to know and love about this thing we call Jazzaffair.

 

March 11, 2011

TELLING IT LIKE IT IS:
Three Rivers is the Sequoia gateway community

by Sarah Elliott

  As tourism continues to grow as a viable Tulare County industry, a couple of nearby communities have jumped on this bandwagon, one that Three Rivers has been riding for over a century.
   Visalia can continue to develop its walkable downtown and promote agri-tourism, and because they have allotted the budget, they can even operate their seasonal “Sequoia Shuttle.” Exeter can claim “The Prettiest Painted Place” catchphrase due to its spectacular murals.
   But what neither one of these towns should claim — but they constantly do — is the “Gateway to Sequoia National Park” title.  That designation is for Three Rivers, and Three Rivers alone.
   Case in point: The National Geographic Society, by its very name, knows a thing or two about geography. Interestingly, the new Sierra Nevada Geotourism MapGuide includes Three Rivers due to its location and elevation, but Visalia and Exeter are not eligible to be included in this project.
   Take that, City of Visalia, that schedules dozens of shuttle trips per day through Three Rivers all summer long but won’t allow stops for riders who might want to spend time (and money) in Three Rivers. In other words, the Sequoia Shuttle leaves nothing but fumes in Three Rivers as its vans pass back and forth from morning till night.
   To accommodate the new geotourism influx, Three Rivers needs to latch onto the Gateway to Sequoia National Park claim permanently while upgrading infrastructure — transportation center, restrooms, picnic area, river access, and a walkable business center. Is that too much to ask in exchange for our tax dollars, County of Tulare?

 

 

 
THE KAWEAH COMMONWEALTH is published every Friday in Three Rivers, California.
EDITORS/PUBLISHERS: John Elliott and Sarah Barton Elliott
41841 Sierra Drive (Highway 198), Three Rivers, CA 93271
MAIL: P.O. Box 806, Three Rivers, CA 93271
(559) 561-3627 FAX: (559) 561-0118
editor@kaweahcommonwealth.com
© Copyright 2003-2009 The Kaweah Commonwealth